Archives

  • Vol. 26 No. 2 (2021)

    We are very pleased to publish the second issue of the twenty-sixth volume of the Coventry Law Journal, which marks the 25th anniversary of the Journal. This event was marked by a special conference held on September 30-1 October this year, where contributors from past editions presented their pieces, together with appropriate updates.

    This gave us an opportunity to reflect on the Journal and what it has achieved over the years. We would like to thank all contributors, but particularly those who presented at the conference. These included regular contributors Dr Stuart MacLennan and Dr Steve Foster (your editors), Professor Barry Mitchell, Dr Mark Ryan and Dr Rona Epstein and Alex Simmonds from Coventry University, Professor Michael Adams from the University of New England, Australia, Chris and Nicola Monaghan from the University of Worcester, Laurence Vick (ex-student and solicitor), Professor Egbewole from Nigeria, and Sukhninder Panesar from the University of Wolverhampton. Special thanks go to Professor Nigel Duncan, and others who chaired panels; and to Dr MacLennan who organised and coordinated the whole event.

    This issue contains pieces that reflect on legal developments over the last 25 years, and in particular, Dr Steve Foster examines both the rule of law and the protection of human rights in the UK Constitution in two articles that attack recent proposals for reform in these areas. There are also reflections from Professor Adams on comparative research, Dr Epstein on imprisonment for debt, and Dr Stanford On elections and voter ID. We also, once again, include articles from a colleague from Nigeria, as well as recent developments on various aspects of human rights and constitutional law.

    The Coventry Law Journal has gone from strength to strength since it first started in 1996 with two principal aims: to inform our students of recent legal developments, and to provide staff and students with an opportunity to publish their research. Both aims have been achieved admirably over the years, but it has also attracted contributions from outside the university, numerous citations in other works, and publication on Westlaw. Thanks go to everyone who have contributed and here is to the next 25 years!

    We hope you enjoy reading this issue and we look forward to your contributions in future issues. If you wish to contribute to the Journal and want any advice or assistance in being published then please contact the editors: the next publication date is July 2022, and contributions need to be forwarded by early June.

    The editors: Dr Steve Foster and Dr Stuart MacLennan

  • Vol. 26 No. 1 (2021)

    We are pleased to publish the first issue of the twenty-sixth volume of the Coventry Law Journal. As with previous issues, this issue contains articles, recent developments, case notes and student essays on a wide variety of legal areas, such as human rights, criminal justice, discrimination law, commercial law, arbitration, employment law, legal history, tort, corporate and company law and property law. Our thanks go to those staff and students who have contributed their research and time to this issue. We are especially pleased to include contributions from outside the school; by Dr Liz Hales, who has written an article on care of young children in the criminal justice system, and (another) Steve Foster, from Manchester Grammar School, who has written on possible future reform of the Human Rights Act.

    We are also pleased to include contributions from past and present students, both at Coventry and at SWUPL, our partner university in China. The Law School encourages student work and writing, and we have included a number of student articles, essays and case notes in this issue.

    This issue is dedicated to three former colleagues in the Law School who have sadly passed away since the publication of the last issue of the Journal. It is difficult to describe the level of commitment that Kevin Williams, David Royall, and Colin Perkin gave to the Law School in addition to their individual contribution to the university and legal education in general. Collectively, they gave over seventy-five years’ service to Lanchester Polytechnic, Coventry Polytechnic and Coventry University, and each will be fondly remembered and missed terribly, as former colleagues and as friends. A special feature on each of these exceptional teachers is included in this issue.

    We are bidding farewell and good luck to three staff members: Dr Luke Graham, who has secured a post at Manchester University, Dr Emma Marchant, who is returning to the University of Birmingham, and Nicholas Squires, who is retiring after more than 25 years’ at the University. Both Luke and Emma have made significant contributions at Coventry in their short stays with us, and we would like to thank them for all their hard work and inspiration. We wish Nick a happy retirement.

    We hope you enjoy reading this issue and we look forward to your contributions in future issues. If you wish to contribute to the Journal and want any advice or assistance in being published, then please contact the editors: the next publication date is December 2021, which will coincide with our twenty-fifth anniversary celebrations, and contributions need to be forwarded by early November. The Law School will host a conference in October of this year to celebrate twenty-five years of the Journal, inviting previous contributors to recall their academic pieces and report on any changes to the law since initial publication. The December 2021 issue will include some of those contributions together with new pieces.

    The editors: Dr Steve Foster and Dr Stuart MacLennan

  • Vol. 25 No. 2 (2020)

    We are pleased to publish the second issue of the twenty-fifth volume of the Coventry Law Journal. As with previous issues, this issue contains articles, recent developments and case notes on a wide variety of legal areas, such as human rights, discrimination law, corporate crime, criminal fraud, employment law, environmental law, European Union law, and international law. Our thanks go to those staff who have contributed their research and time to this issue. We are especially pleased to include articles by staff from Law Schools outside Coventry, as well from our students: Anna O’Shea, who has written a joint piece with Dr Steve Foster on facial technology and human rights; and Emmy Tolini, who has contributed her recent dissertation on EU solidarity.

    This issue is dedicated to Dr Ben Stanford, our colleague and friend, who is leaving Coventry to join the Law School at Liverpool John Moores. Ben joined the Law School at Coventry four years ago and since that time has excelled in all areas of academic life: as a teacher, a researcher and in carrying out his duties as a course leader. Hugely popular with staff and students, Ben has received praise for his teaching on and organisation of all his modules, and has managed to combine his total commitment to teaching with an excellent research and publication record, publishing in esteemed journals such as Public Law and the European Human Rights Law Review. In addition, he has carried out a high number of administrative duties with great calm and capability, and organised and participated in staff research activities. We are delighted to include a case note of his in this edition, and hope that he will contribute to the journal in the future. Ben has been a true friend of the School and the Journal and we dedicate this issue to him and wish him every success in his future career.

    We hope you enjoy reading this issue and we look forward to your contributions in future issues. If you wish to contribute to the Journal and want any advice or assistance in getting published, then please contact the editors: the next publication date is April 2021, which will coincide with our twenty-fifth anniversary, and contributions need to be forwarded by early March.

    The editors: Dr Steve Foster and Dr Stuart MacLennan

  • Vol. 25 No. 1 (2020)

    We are pleased to publish the first issue of the twenty-fifth volume of the Coventry Law Journal, a special issue featuring selected papers from the EU-CARICOM Law Conference held at Coventry University on 10th and 11th October 2019. The theme of the conference was ‘Beyond Brexit: Sustaining Business and Law Relations’. Academic readers of this journal will be familiar with the tenuous resemblance that conference themes often bear to the papers presented, however, in this instance the conference papers were all faithful to the theme. Nevertheless, the themes emerging from a conference often evolve and this is reflected in the theme of this special issue: ‘Law, Education, and Entrepreneurship in the Age of Brexit’.

    The first article of this special issue provides an historical and contemporary overview of the origins of Brexit. Anna-Theresia Krein contrasts the United Kingdom’s looser relationship with the European Union to that of Germany’s, concluding that seeds of Brexit were sown long before 2016. An apt introduction to the articles that follow. 

    ‘Trade in goods after Brexit’ takes us, appropriately, beyond Brexit, considering the various options for the United Kingdom’s relationship for trade in goods with the European Union. Dr MacLennan identifies many of the hurdles that have to be overcome in such a future relationship and concludes that there is no easy solution to these problems.

    One of the challenges identified by Dr MacLennan – customs procedures – is elaborated upon by Leonie Zappel. ‘Customs procedures after Brexit’ identifies a number of potential procedural changes that might be used to overcome these challenges.

    ‘Electronic bills of lading in international trade transactions’ explores the opportunities presented by new technological approaches to bills of lading. While acknowledging the promise of new technologies like ‘blockchain’ for the development of bills of lading, Dr Marxen sounds a cautious note in contrast to the enthusiasm and excitement prevalent in some circles of the international trade (finance) industry.

    In ‘The impact of Brexit on the United Kingdom’s start-up ecosystem’ Professor Dr Asghari and Mathis Vetter consider the effects of Brexit on entrepreneurship. They consider, in particular, the macroeconomic and microeconomic effects on start-ups. They further consider how changes in a complex, modern, open economy might impact start-ups concerning the loss of important framework conditions.

    Finally, Dr Ben Stanford and Dr Steve Foster share their experience of using publishing opportunities to improve legal writing skills in ‘Enhancing student knowledge and skills with publishing opportunities’. The product of this experience can be seen in the student case notes on ground-breaking cases in the English Legal System that conclude this issue, written as part of their assessment for their module on Academic and Career Development. These case notes were selected as the top case notes for that assignment. Well done to those students.

    We hope you enjoy reading this issue and we look forward to your contributions in future issues. If you wish to contribute to the Journal and want any advice or assistance in getting published, then please contact the editors: the next publication date is December 2020 and contributions need to be forwarded by early November.

    The editors: Dr Stuart MacLennan and Dr Steve Foster.